Install Theme
Does it ever just absolutely baffle you how extremely resilient yet at the same time fragile, the human species is? It oftentimes baffles me. We can and do survive so much crap on a regular basis, those posts about people surviving through months or days of torture, people who have had all their limbs torn off, people who have been at the brink and yet made it. But then all it takes is a weakened artery, or a cell to reproduce rapidly and spread to other parts of the body, and poof. You're dead.

sixpenceee:

I love this

undeadeddie:

Some horror films I’m looking forward to!

undeadeddie
humanoidhistory:

Dr. Jonas Salk, the man behind the polio vaccine, April 1955. Photo by Al Fenn for LIFE magazine.

humanoidhistory:

Dr. Jonas Salk, the man behind the polio vaccine, April 1955. Photo by Al Fenn for LIFE magazine.

lucidnirvana:

natural-magics:

Fairy Tale by Moonshroomnshroom

peace and positivity here

lucidnirvana:

natural-magics:

Fairy Tale by Moonshroomnshroom

peace and positivity here
fotocommunity.de

Fair Use in Novels

thedancingwriter:

I often get questions from Anons asking me what is appropriate to use in a novel, from song quotes to character names of wildly popular characters from other books (names that are obviously more unique than just Sarah or Alice or Amelia). So I’m going to lay the groundwork of what writers can and can’t use in their novels—or for their novels.

  1. Quotes from song lyrics. You can’t do this. Period. If you want to use quoted song lyrics, you would have to get permission from the artists themselves—and you would likely have to pay a heady sum of money to obtain that permission. A big part of the reason why you can’t do this is because song lyrics are often so short in the first place, and if you misquote even one word, you run the risk of being sued. In fact, you run the risk of being sued period if your book is somehow published with quoted song lyrics from an actual band. 
  1. Names of fictional characters. One Anon asked me if he or she could use a fictional character’s name as a nickname for one of his/her characters. As far as I know, this is not copyright infringement, especially if the character whose nicknamed Harry Potter does not in anyway resemble the actual Harry Potter. It is also not copyright infringement to use a fictional character’s name in passing. For example, in Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick, Leonard frequently mentions Holden Caulfield as a comparison to himself. Holden Caulfield, however, is not an actual character in the book. There’s also the question of cameos, and whether or not a writer can use an actual character as a cameo in the book. This is on shaky ground, because using a published fictional character as a cameo technically is not copyright infringement, until that character actually starts talking. However, from the article I linked to you, you still run the risk of being sued. Fan fiction is an entirely different matter, as most writers don’t profit from this work, and authors want to please enthusiastic readers. (I would both cry and feel EXTREMELY flattered if someone were to ever write a fanfiction of my book, When Stars Die.)
  1. Public domain. Any book before 1923 is fair use. Granted this does not mean you can re-write the entire book. Basically this means you can quote these works, while attributing their authors to them, in your novels. Frenchie,from Death, Dickinson, and the Demented Life of Frenchie Garcia by Jenny Torres Sanchez, frequently talks about Emily Dickinson and quotes her as well. Libba Bray puts a part of Tennyson’s poem, The Lady of Shallot, in A Great and Terrible Beauty. And when I do revisions for my novels, I’d like for my protagonist to quote parts of Edgar Allen Poe. 
  2. Titles. You don’t need permission to use song titles, movie titles, book titles, television titles, and so on and so forth. You can also include the names of things, place, and events and people in your work without permission. I mention Paula Dean in brief passing in the current work I’m writing, because she owns a restaurant in Savannah, Georgia, the place my character lives. 
  3. Pictures. I’m primarily talking about if you’re self-publishing or are allowed to work with your publisher (usually small press) on designing the cover. ANY stock photos listed on any stock photo website is fair game and can be photoshopped as much as you want to. However, you often have to buy these photos, but once you pay for them, they are yours to do with what you want. Unfortunately, you run the risk of having a similar book cover as another book, especially if you don’t do too much to that image beyond slapping your name and title of the book on it. The cover for When Stars Die received a heavy makeover, so it is not likely that I will find another book using my exact cover. I may find a book using the girl on the cover, but the plum blossoms, the colors, how the girl was edited, and my title and name are probably going to be next to impossible to find on another book. 
  4. Quoting famous people. If the quote from, let’s say, a famous speech in the past, is over 100 years old, that work is likely in the public domain, so it’s fair to use quotes from  Georgie Washington or another popular figure. 
  5. Referencing facts. If you’re referencing facts, like how the universe was made, this is not copyright infringement—they are unadorned facts. For the current novel I’m working on, I did use a website to help Gene’s teacher explain black holes, because Gene uses black holes as a motif to describe how people can have an effect on one another. However, because this is knowledge that you can pick up from any text book or even an astronomy class you took, I don’t need to quote the source I took it from because I did not repeat word-for-word what that website said. The website simply listed facts that you can find anywhere from a legitimate source. 
  6. Using quotes from TV, films, or advertising. These are copyrighted, so don’t use them, unless you want to get sued. 

For now, these are the only points I can think of on what writers are allowed to use and not use in their novels. If someone can think of anything more, feel free to re-blog and add to this list!

Ask Box is always open, and I think this is the last day for my book/Amazon gift card giveaway, so you better enter while you can!

thedancingwriter
samswings
capturedphotos
distant-traveller:

A slice of stars

The thin, glowing streak slicing across this image cuts a lonely figure, with only a few foreground stars and galaxies in the distant background for company.
However, this is all a case of perspective; lying out of frame is another nearby spiral. Together, these two galaxies make up a pair, moving through space together and keeping one another company.
The subject of this Hubble image is called NGC 3501, with NGC 3507 as its out-of-frame companion. The two galaxies look very different — another example of the importance of perspective. NGC 3501 appears edge-on, giving it an elongated and very narrow appearance. Its partner, however, looks very different indeed, appearing face-on and giving us a fantastic view of its barred swirling arms.
While similar arms may not be visible in this image of NGC 3501, this galaxy is also a spiral — although it is somewhat different from its companion. While NGC 3507 has bars cutting through its centre, NGC 3501 does not. Instead, its loosely wound spiral arms all originate from its centre. The bright gas and stars that make up these arms can be seen here glowing brightly, mottled by the dark dust lanes that trace across the galaxy.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowledgement: Nick Rose

distant-traveller:

A slice of stars

The thin, glowing streak slicing across this image cuts a lonely figure, with only a few foreground stars and galaxies in the distant background for company.

However, this is all a case of perspective; lying out of frame is another nearby spiral. Together, these two galaxies make up a pair, moving through space together and keeping one another company.

The subject of this Hubble image is called NGC 3501, with NGC 3507 as its out-of-frame companion. The two galaxies look very different — another example of the importance of perspective. NGC 3501 appears edge-on, giving it an elongated and very narrow appearance. Its partner, however, looks very different indeed, appearing face-on and giving us a fantastic view of its barred swirling arms.

While similar arms may not be visible in this image of NGC 3501, this galaxy is also a spiral — although it is somewhat different from its companion. While NGC 3507 has bars cutting through its centre, NGC 3501 does not. Instead, its loosely wound spiral arms all originate from its centre. The bright gas and stars that make up these arms can be seen here glowing brightly, mottled by the dark dust lanes that trace across the galaxy.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowledgement: Nick Rose

spacetelescope.org
starcatkin:

just—space:

ARP147 (right) collided with the elliptical galaxy in centre triggering a wave of star formation leading to supernova and blackholes. [3600x3016]

starcatkin:

just—space:

ARP147 (right) collided with the elliptical galaxy in centre triggering a wave of star formation leading to supernova and blackholes. [3600x3016]

just--space
faygo-fuckyourself:

Onward!
John / Dave / Makeup / Photographer

faygo-fuckyourself:

Onward!

John / Dave / Makeup / Photographer

faygo-fuckyourself

zerostatereflex:

Electric bacteria connect to form wires

"Some bacteria produce hair-like filaments that act as wires, ferrying electrons back and forth between the cells and their environment."

This is fascinating. 

"The discovery of electric bacteria shows that some very basic forms of life can do away with sugary middlemen and handle the energy in its purest form – electrons, harvested from the surface of minerals. "It is truly foreign, you know," says Nealson. "In a sense, alien.""

Nice. See the article here for the juicy science details. 

amandaspoetry:

Amanda Helm

amandaspoetry:

Amanda Helm

fifisnowbar

limey404:

eyyyy so this part 1 of a commission for a super cool person whose girlfriend came up with an A+ AU, lemme just copypaste the summary of it mmyes

"1930s Gravity Falls AU where Uncle Stan’s a bootlegger who runs a still, and maybe a moldy little sideshow as well. When the kids move in one summer he soon has them running rum all through the valley (vintage car chases with the deputies optional, but encouraged) and in their spare time, they investigate all the usual bizarre goings-on in Gravity Falls. She also thought maybe Li’l Gideon would be some kind of tent revival preacher boy, whom Mabel kept having to fend off."

I AM SO ON BOARD WITH THIS

this was so much fun and there’s more to come yeayeayea

limey404