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thenewenlightenmentage:

On Cloudy Alien Planets, a Chance for Life
The cloudier an alien planet is, the closer it can get to its star and still remain potentially life-friendly, researchers say.
In fact, clouds might help Earth-like planets remain hospitable to life even when orbiting a sun-like star as closely as the hellish Venus circles the sun in our solar system, the scientists added.
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thenewenlightenmentage:

On Cloudy Alien Planets, a Chance for Life

The cloudier an alien planet is, the closer it can get to its star and still remain potentially life-friendly, researchers say.

In fact, clouds might help Earth-like planets remain hospitable to life even when orbiting a sun-like star as closely as the hellish Venus circles the sun in our solar system, the scientists added.

Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Speed of a Planet’s Rotation Has Huge Effect on Possibility of Life
“Rotation can have a huge effect, and lots of planets that we previously thought were definitely not habitable now can be considered as candidates,” says Dorian Abbot of the University of Chicago. New research has revealed that the rate at which a planet spins is instrumental in its ability to support life. Not only does rotation control the length of day and night, it can also tug on the winds that blow through the atmosphere and ultimately influence cloud formation.
There are currently almost 2,000 extrasolar planets known to us, but most are inhospitable gas giants. Thanks to NASA’s Kepler mission, a handful of smaller, rockier planets have been discovered within the habitable zones of their stars that could provide a niche for alien life.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Speed of a Planet’s Rotation Has Huge Effect on Possibility of Life

“Rotation can have a huge effect, and lots of planets that we previously thought were definitely not habitable now can be considered as candidates,” says Dorian Abbot of the University of Chicago. New research has revealed that the rate at which a planet spins is instrumental in its ability to support life. Not only does rotation control the length of day and night, it can also tug on the winds that blow through the atmosphere and ultimately influence cloud formation.

There are currently almost 2,000 extrasolar planets known to us, but most are inhospitable gas giants. Thanks to NASA’s Kepler mission, a handful of smaller, rockier planets have been discovered within the habitable zones of their stars that could provide a niche for alien life.

Continue Reading

bowlerhatscience:

The first spacecraft to orbit a comet has arrived

We have known about comets as long as we have been human. When we see comets in the sky from Earth, the first thing we notice is their tails: streamers of gas and dust pointing away from the Sun.

bowlerhatscience:

The first spacecraft to orbit a comet has arrived

We have known about comets as long as we have been human. When we see comets in the sky from Earth, the first thing we notice is their tails: streamers of gas and dust pointing away from the Sun.

christinetheastrophysicist:

Clouds on Titan
Over a two day period at the end of July, the Cassini spacecraft has captured some images of clouds forming and disappearing on Saturn’s moon Titan. Moving above the large hydrocarbon lake Ligeia Mare, these clouds were measured to be moving about 7 to 10 mph. Scientists are interested in learning if these cloud formations signal the changing of seasons and if they naturally form over bodies of liquid.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL

christinetheastrophysicist:

Clouds on Titan

Over a two day period at the end of July, the Cassini spacecraft has captured some images of clouds forming and disappearing on Saturn’s moon Titan. Moving above the large hydrocarbon lake Ligeia Mare, these clouds were measured to be moving about 7 to 10 mph. Scientists are interested in learning if these cloud formations signal the changing of seasons and if they naturally form over bodies of liquid.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL

raptinawe:

Palm Beach in New South Wales, Australia. Photograph by Joe Hsu. 

(via Photo of the Day: Best of July | PROOF)

raptinawe:

Palm Beach in New South Wales, Australia. Photograph by Joe Hsu.

(via Photo of the Day: Best of July | PROOF)

battalio:

New model explaining why Jupiter’s mysterious Great Red Spot has not disappeared
However, there is evidence that the great red spot is shrinking.

battalio:

New model explaining why Jupiter’s mysterious Great Red Spot has not disappeared

However, there is evidence that the great red spot is shrinking.

inadventures:

Tea is drunk to forget the din of the world. ~T’ien Yi-heng

inadventures:

Tea is drunk to forget the din of the world. ~T’ien Yi-heng

doomandgloomfromthetomb:

SUMMER OF DEAD 2014: Charlotte Coliseum, Charlotte, North Carolina, March 23, 1995
Dig it! Philly taper extraordinaire Sebastian Darkly Petsu (whose Solar Motel Band recordings we hyped endlessly last summer) writes up a show from Jerry’s final days. 
I first heard this Charlotte show via an audience tape in April 1995 and have loved it ever since. Back then, getting a show on tape less than a month after it happened seemed like a high-speed miracle. I was a suburban high school sophomore whose tapes were mostly 8th generation dubs from fatherly senior class Deadheads and a guy at a New Hope, PA flea market. Most of the tapes I was acquiring were the classic shows that adult Deadheads had already had for years. So it was great to hear a current tape of the band.
This show features well-played renditions of 4 new songs that probably would’ve been on the band’s next album and it got me excited for the Dead’s future. This is a go-to show, because it makes me dream of what the Dead could’ve sounded like consistently in the Fall of 1995 and beyond, if Garcia had successfully cleaned himself up. It’s not a perfect performance and the addled Jerry definitely blows some vocals and leads, but overall it’s damn good.
It’s not “man this is so good it sounds like it could be 1970-whatever.” No. The style, setlist, and tones are very much of the 90s, but unlike the many trainwreck shows of the final years, it’s all done with gusto. Perhaps it was the addition of guest/part-time member Bruce Hornsby on piano that pushed everyone else up a notch. Say what you will about Hornsby as a standard bearer of adult-contemporary elevator soundtracks, he was also a great ensemble player with the Dead. His grand piano somehow meshes with Vince Welnick’s awful high-register synth tones to create a very palatable and dense swirl of 176 keys.
The band never fully did justice to “Unbroken Chain” on stage and the long-delayed live debut is something that’s cooler on paper than in your ears. But of the handful of performances the band did during 1995, this second set opener comes closest to capturing the magic of the 1974 studio recording. Lesh’s voice is great in that distinctive foghorn way and Hornsby’s piano adds sparkle. Unfortunately the drummers seem stiff and tentative and Garcia never really grabs the song by the horns, but he still manages to throw in quite a few pretty flourishes.
In the transition between Scarlet->Fire the band takes it way down and holds it down in a lull for a few minutes while Bruce and Vince flutter. Jerry then comes in and rips the top off, diving into the “Fire” theme when you least expect it. Even on the soundboard you can hear the crowd roar and the energy and excitement are sustained for the next 16 minutes. Weir’s “Corrina” got a lot of shit from jaded vets, but I dare you to listen and tell me it doesn’t have a monster groove that keeps the set’s momentum going. All these simple little parts from 7 players mesh wonderfully in it. Coming out of “Corrina,” we get “Mathilda” and it starts out a mess. It sounds like Garcia forces the band into the melody at the beginning, but by the 1:35 mark the whole band is finally on the same page and then they really go for it whole hog. The two minute jam after “Matilda” is just Hornsby and the drummers. Listen to how many damn ideas they squeeze into the length of a punk song before the piano bows out and we get 12 minutes of bash/bang/bubble.
Hornsby initiates a pulse about a minute into “Space” and his pure acoustic piano forms a good base for all the MiDI-ed weirdness the rest of the band throws on top. Hornsby then switches to synth and Welnick holds down the piano for the band’s best-ever version of the funereal ballad “Days Between,” coming out of “Space”’s ether. Everybody except the plodding drummers seems in top form, supporting Garcia’s well-suited croak and moan.
They encore with the final ever version of the Band’s “The Weight.” It’s a swaying, sing-along affair that fittingly caps off one the Grateful Dead’s last great shows.
Sebastian Darkly Petsu makes controlled feedback sound art with creatively wired tape decks. He works as a historical tour guide in Philadelphia. He hosts the occasional Double Decker Music Series — mobile concerts on top of tour buses. He often records shows with his little Tascam. He loves the music of Benjamin Britten, Birdie Busch and Burzum. He’s seen 120 Phish shows and counting. He can be reached at sebastianpetsu@gmail.com. 

doomandgloomfromthetomb:

SUMMER OF DEAD 2014: Charlotte Coliseum, Charlotte, North Carolina, March 23, 1995

Dig it! Philly taper extraordinaire Sebastian Darkly Petsu (whose Solar Motel Band recordings we hyped endlessly last summer) writes up a show from Jerry’s final days. 

I first heard this Charlotte show via an audience tape in April 1995 and have loved it ever since. Back then, getting a show on tape less than a month after it happened seemed like a high-speed miracle. I was a suburban high school sophomore whose tapes were mostly 8th generation dubs from fatherly senior class Deadheads and a guy at a New Hope, PA flea market. Most of the tapes I was acquiring were the classic shows that adult Deadheads had already had for years. So it was great to hear a current tape of the band.

This show features well-played renditions of 4 new songs that probably would’ve been on the band’s next album and it got me excited for the Dead’s future. This is a go-to show, because it makes me dream of what the Dead could’ve sounded like consistently in the Fall of 1995 and beyond, if Garcia had successfully cleaned himself up. It’s not a perfect performance and the addled Jerry definitely blows some vocals and leads, but overall it’s damn good.

It’s not “man this is so good it sounds like it could be 1970-whatever.” No. The style, setlist, and tones are very much of the 90s, but unlike the many trainwreck shows of the final years, it’s all done with gusto. Perhaps it was the addition of guest/part-time member Bruce Hornsby on piano that pushed everyone else up a notch. Say what you will about Hornsby as a standard bearer of adult-contemporary elevator soundtracks, he was also a great ensemble player with the Dead. His grand piano somehow meshes with Vince Welnick’s awful high-register synth tones to create a very palatable and dense swirl of 176 keys.

The band never fully did justice to “Unbroken Chain” on stage and the long-delayed live debut is something that’s cooler on paper than in your ears. But of the handful of performances the band did during 1995, this second set opener comes closest to capturing the magic of the 1974 studio recording. Lesh’s voice is great in that distinctive foghorn way and Hornsby’s piano adds sparkle. Unfortunately the drummers seem stiff and tentative and Garcia never really grabs the song by the horns, but he still manages to throw in quite a few pretty flourishes.

In the transition between Scarlet->Fire the band takes it way down and holds it down in a lull for a few minutes while Bruce and Vince flutter. Jerry then comes in and rips the top off, diving into the “Fire” theme when you least expect it. Even on the soundboard you can hear the crowd roar and the energy and excitement are sustained for the next 16 minutes. Weir’s “Corrina” got a lot of shit from jaded vets, but I dare you to listen and tell me it doesn’t have a monster groove that keeps the set’s momentum going. All these simple little parts from 7 players mesh wonderfully in it. Coming out of “Corrina,” we get “Mathilda” and it starts out a mess. It sounds like Garcia forces the band into the melody at the beginning, but by the 1:35 mark the whole band is finally on the same page and then they really go for it whole hog. The two minute jam after “Matilda” is just Hornsby and the drummers. Listen to how many damn ideas they squeeze into the length of a punk song before the piano bows out and we get 12 minutes of bash/bang/bubble.

Hornsby initiates a pulse about a minute into “Space” and his pure acoustic piano forms a good base for all the MiDI-ed weirdness the rest of the band throws on top. Hornsby then switches to synth and Welnick holds down the piano for the band’s best-ever version of the funereal ballad “Days Between,” coming out of “Space”’s ether. Everybody except the plodding drummers seems in top form, supporting Garcia’s well-suited croak and moan.

They encore with the final ever version of the Band’s “The Weight.” It’s a swaying, sing-along affair that fittingly caps off one the Grateful Dead’s last great shows.

Sebastian Darkly Petsu makes controlled feedback sound art with creatively wired tape decks. He works as a historical tour guide in Philadelphia. He hosts the occasional Double Decker Music Series — mobile concerts on top of tour buses. He often records shows with his little Tascam. He loves the music of Benjamin Britten, Birdie Busch and Burzum. He’s seen 120 Phish shows and counting. He can be reached at sebastianpetsu@gmail.com

doomandgloomfromthetomb

barefootwalk:

[Hand Series - Stages of detachment]

Never ever have feelings for me because I will rip your heart and blow the pieces like dandelion seeds

@davidisnotastarvingartist replied to your post “I might wear makeup tomorrow”

Why bother? You are beautiful enough without makeup.

Just wanna try something new~

wcw goes to meet-your-marijuana because she’s a babe and makes me feel like I’m not a fuck up ily bae

I might wear makeup tomorrow

sixpenceee:

As a paranormal/horror blogger I can assure you these child abuse ads are the most scariest and saddest thing I’ve ever seen. Probably because things like that are happening RIGHT NOW at this very INSTANT. 

And it’s horrifying but hopefully these ads bring more attention towards it. 

I got these from this buzzfeed article. You can view more ads and the sources for these ads there as well.